English IV is currently reading excerpts from Frankenstein along with pairing excerpts from Paradise Lost. With our department aligning to our Catholic identity, both books celebrate the protagonists’ strong will to search and shape one’s identity. We, as teachers, are able to hone in on several Catholic curriculum standards such as: strengthening moral character, the importance of good vs. evil between man and the physical world, and human conditions, behaviors, and actions. John Milton’s characters from Paradise Lost are echoed in Frankenstein as God, Satan, and Adam. Students are comparing and contrasting situations in both pieces and applying situations with a true vision of our Catholic identity. One theme the students analyze is the goodness of nature and the limitations of science in relation to nature. This idea is very much present during the Romantic Literary Period of the novel’s inception; however, this is a deeply Catholic theme: the goodness of nature. Much more than a reaction to the industrialization and materialization of the day, the creation of the Monster by Frankenstein represents an adulteration of the nature of life. Life is created good by God, our Creator, and He brings forth ‘good fruit’ through His creatures. Students walked through passages in the novel that demonstrate how when life is altered by man (science in the novel), it lacks the goodness intended and present from its true Creator, God. What follows is the monster Frankenstein creates, and its life is a source of sorrow to itself and man.